Value-Brief anfordern
Seite 1 von 5 123 ... LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 1 bis 10 von 44

Thema: Management eines Unternehmens

  1. #1
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    01.06.2001
    Ort
    Scherzingen/Schweiz
    Beiträge
    1.029

    Standard

    Hallo Arman,

    ich habe jetzt bei Value-Wissen einfach mal das Thema Management-Beurteilung eröffnet.

    Die Texte von David Marino-Nachison kopiere ich einfach mal hier rein, vielleicht besteht ja mehr Interesse. Für unsere Zwecke habe ich dann das Wichtigste ins Deutsche einfach frei übersetzt.

    Aber für jeden, der lieber das Original liest:


    http://www.fool.com/index.htm?ref=Yo

    ------Anfang

    By Dave Marino-Nachison (TMF Braden)
    August 7, 2001

    As Jerry Seinfeld said so many times that he just about made a career of
    it, "Who are these people?" As a part-owner, or prospective part-owner, of
    a business, members of management are the folks to whom we entrust the
    management of our money -- hopefully, for years. While it may not be as
    monumental as handing over a child's hand in marriage, it's still pretty
    darn important, and who would want to give that kind of responsibility to
    a stranger?

    With this in mind, an investor's first trip should be right to a company's
    annual report and proxy statement -- known, in SEC-filing-ese, as the
    "10-K" and "14-A," respectively -- for basic information. These should, at
    the very least, include the name, title, recent history at the company,
    and outside directorships, if any, as well as compensation information,
    for a company's executive officers and board members.

    Those reports may also hold information on an executive's employment
    history before joining the company. If not, corporate media or investor
    relations departments generally have prepared bios available, at least for
    top managers. (They may even be posted online.) Some, but not all, may
    even make resumes available to inquisitive investors.

    Of course, bios and resumes are, in the end, marketing materials -- I, for
    example, lied about my high school diploma to get hired here -- and
    investors should, at the very least, consider a Web search using Google,
    Northern Light, or a similar website, for more information from outside
    sources.

    News archives, such as that of CNet's News.com, and industry-specific news
    sites and publications, may also be useful. The glossy business magazines
    frequently run in-depth profiles of corporate managers: Forbes' website
    has a "people search" and "tracker" to keep you abreast of news and
    developments involving business' movers and shakers. And a visit to a few
    corporate discussion boards to ask questions and collect impressions can't
    hurt.

    It's worthwhile to look beyond the chairman and CEO. Does your company
    have a succession plan in place? Who would step in if the CEO's train ran
    off the tracks? Is there, for lack of a better word, "depth" in the ranks?

    OK, now what?
    What do you do once you've gathered up all this biographical information?
    And how much is enough? The answers to those questions are up to you, but
    at the very least it's good to get a sense of managers' background with
    their current company, employment, and educational history. You may find
    out your CEO successfully pulled a company out of bankruptcy (not bad&#33,
    or perhaps sent a dot-com into one (not so good).

    Maybe they've only managed small companies and could be poorly prepared
    for rapid growth. Maybe they've been in place for 35 years and are looking
    forward to more golf next summer. Or perhaps they have a sterling track
    record at every stop: Some money managers follow favorite managers
    faithfully from company to company, trusting in their time-tested ability
    to run companies effectively.

    Conversely, you may uncover rampant job-hopping, past or current criminal
    or fraudulent activities and entanglements, tussles with regulators for
    bad accounting practices or aggressive revenue recognition policies, UFO
    fixations, conflicts on the board of directors, or remarkable humanitarian
    tendencies.

    So does any of this translate into clear buy/sell/hold instructions?

    Well, it might. The Rule Breaker team, for example, saw lots to like about
    Belgian speech recognition technology company Lernout & Hauspie but
    eventually passed on it as an investment because of questions about the
    background of one its top folks -- including one who had steered a company
    the portfolio once sold short. That call paid off, as Lernout & Hauspie
    has since filed for bankruptcy.

    On the other hand, some situations that seem to wave red flags may in fact
    reveal checkered flags just around the bend. Travel and real estate
    services company Cendant (NYSE: CD) was one of the late 1990s'
    highest-profile blowups (scroll down for story), as the company's market
    value was decimated by news of sketchy audits and accounting. But Henry
    Silverman -- who was CEO of HFS Inc. when that company merged with CUC
    International to form Cendant in 1997 -- stuck with his ship, and is now
    the chairman and CEO of a recovering operation that, while perhaps not a
    Wall Street darling, has nevertheless returned to health and investor
    favor.

    Unfortunately, even a seemingly intensive "background check" may not
    protect you from fraud or other criminal -- or, at least, underhanded --
    activity. Many accounting shenanigans, for example, are invisible to all
    but the eyes of skilled accountants. As a result, some investors may
    choose to try to hedge against this by sticking to companies with long
    traditions of performance and executives who are known quantities --
    though even that strategy can miss.

    In stock investing, the total elimination of risk simply isn't possible.
    Investing is, however, about understanding risk and the degree to which
    you're willing to accept it. Investigating the background of a company's
    top management is just one more way to stay on top of important risk
    factors, rather than be blindsided by them.

    ---------Ende

  2. #2
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    01.06.2001
    Ort
    Scherzingen/Schweiz
    Beiträge
    1.029

    Standard

    Dann können wir mit dem ersten Teil anfangen:


    Wie bewerte ich das Management eines Unternehmens.

    1. Basisarbeit

    Als Teilhaber oder zukünftiger Teilhaber eines Unternehmens vertrauen wir den Mitgliedern des Managements unser Geld an – und das hoffentlich einige Jahre lang. Es ist zwar keine Heirat, dennoch ist es *ziemlich wichtig zu wissen, wem wir die Verantwortung für unser Geld übertragen.

    Deshalb sollte ein Investor als Basisinformation den Geschäftsbericht und die Informationen für den Aktionär lesen. Den Geschäftsbericht findet man bei der SEC unter „10-K“ bzw. die Informationen für den Aktionär unter „14-A“. Mindestens findet man dort: Name, Titel, die Laufbahn im Unternehmen und die externen Beziehungen des Aufsichtsrates sowie Informationen über die Gehälter der Manager und Aufsichtsräte.

    Es können ebenfalls Informationen über den Berufsweg des Managers vor dem Eintritt ins Unternehmen enthalten sein. Wenn es darüber keine Informationen gibt, hält die Presseabteilung oder die Abteilung für Investor-Relations normalerweise Daten mindestens über die Top-Manager bereit. (Vielleicht sind sie auch auf der Website veröffentlicht.) Einige Unternehmen, aber bestimmt nicht alle, stellen Investoren sogar Lebensläufe zur Verfügung.

    Natürlich sind diese Daten und Lebensläufe schlussendlich Werbematerial *(es können auch Lügen enthalten sein) und deshalb sollte ein Investor zumindest im Web nach anderen Quellen suchen.

    Nachrichtenarchive, wie Cnet’s News.com und Sites mit branchenspezifische Nachrichten und Publikationen können ebenfalls nützlich sein. Sites von Wirtschaftszeitschriften, usw. schreiben häufig über Unternehmensmanager. Bspw. kann man bei Forbes unter „people search“ und „tracker“ nach Nachrichten und Entwicklungen über die Unternehmenslenker suchen. Der Besuch von HVs kann ebenfalls nicht schaden. Dort kann man auch Fragen stellen und einen Eindruck über das Unternehmen bekommen.

    Man sollte nicht nur den Vorstand und CEO anschauen, sondern auch die nächstfolgenden Manager. Wer würde im Falle eines Rücktritts des CEOs in Frage kommen? Wie sind die Qualitäten der nachfolgenden „Ränge“?

    Wie geht es weiter, nachdem man sämtliche biografischen Informationen gesammelt hat? Wieviel braucht man eigentlich? Die Antwort auf diese Fragen hängt vom einzelnen Investor ab. Zumindest sollte man jedoch ein Gefühl für den Background der Manager bekommen. Vielleicht findet man heraus, dass der CEO bereits erfolgreich einen Turnaround eines anderen Unternehmens vorweisen kann (nicht schlecht&#33 oder dass er eventuell ein Unternehmen in den Ruin getrieben hat (nicht so gut&#33.

    Oder er hat nur kleine Unternehmen gemanagt und ist nicht auf großes Wachstum vorbereitet sein. *Vielleicht ist er bereits 35 Jahre im Unternehmen und freut sich auf mehr Ruhe. Oder sie haben sich so bewährt, dass Fondsmanager ihnen treu von Unternehmen zu Unternehmen aufgrund ihrer Fähigkeiten folgen.

    Umgekehrt könnte man auch übermäßiges Job-Hopping, alte oder neue kriminelle oder betrügerische Aktivitäten und Verwicklungen, Kontroversen mit den Regulierern wegen Bilanzunregelmäßigkeiten sowie Konflikte mit dem Aufsichtsrat entdecken.

    Aber auch ein intensiver „Background Check“ kann den Anleger nicht vor Betrug oder anderen kriminellen Machenschaften schützen. Bei der Anlage in Aktien kann man einfach das Risiko nicht ausschließen. Die Anlage in Aktien bedeutet für jeden Investor sein Risiko-Chance-Verhältnis abzuwägen.



    flippi

  3. #3
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    01.06.2001
    Ort
    Scherzingen/Schweiz
    Beiträge
    1.029

    Standard

    Hier finden wir Informationen über das Management von Colgate-Palmolive:

    http://www.sec.gov/cgi-bin....0021665

    14-A:

    http://www.sec.gov/Archive....234.txt


    10-K:
    http://www.sec.gov/Archive....10k.txt



    Board of Directors

    http://www.colgate.com/cp....ors.jsp


    Executive Management:

    http://www.colgate.com/cp/corp.class...executives.jsp


    Suche nach Mark Reuben:


    http://www.forbes.com/lists/

    Wenn man ein wenig nach unten scrollt, findet man rechts einen Kasten mit “Quotes/Research” “People” “Lookup Symbol”. *Man geht auf “People” und kann dann entsprechende Manager suchen.


    http://www.forbes.com/finance....=216840

    Hier habe ich einen Alert über Mark Reuben eingerichtet und bekomme per Mail Nachrichten, Gehaltveränderungen, Optionsausübungen mitgeteilt:

    http://www.forbes.com/cms....r.jhtml

    Hier habe ich noch William S. Shanahan:

    http://www.forbes.com/finance....=128432

    Auch den Alert eingerichtet:

    http://www.forbes.com/cms....r.jhtml


    Jetzt zu Cnet News.com:

    http://news.com.com/2001-12-0.html?legacy=cnet&tag=news

    Hier habe ich nichts gefunden.

    ----------

    Hier stoppe ich mal. Das ist erst einmal genug Material.

    flippi

  4. #4
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    21.01.2002
    Ort
    Kiel
    Beiträge
    830

    Standard

    Hallo Flippi-Schatzi,

    herzlichen Dank für die Übersetzung.

    Ich sollte meine Englisch-Kenntnisse auffrischen, sonst krieg ich noch ein schlechtes Gewissen.

    Liebe Grüße

    ...demnächst mehr von : Arman
    \"Price is what you pay, Value is what you get\"

    (Warren Buffett)

  5. #5
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    01.06.2001
    Ort
    Scherzingen/Schweiz
    Beiträge
    1.029

    Standard

    Hallo Arman,

    <Kannst du mir zeigen, wie man die Gehaltsstruktur bewertet?>

    Was meintest du denn damit?

    Grüße
    flippi

  6. #6
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    21.01.2002
    Ort
    Kiel
    Beiträge
    830

    Standard

    Hallo Flippi-Schatzi,

    damit meinte ich, wie ich mich davon vergewissern kann, ob z.B. die Gehälter an die erbrachte Leistung gekoppelt sind oder eine Beurteilung der Stock-Options. Profitiert das Management nur von Kursteigerungen oder mehr von anderen Faktoren?

    Liebe Grüße

    Arman
    \"Price is what you pay, Value is what you get\"

    (Warren Buffett)

  7. #7
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    25.05.2001
    Ort
    Pfaffenhofen a.d. Ilm
    Beiträge
    1.116

    Standard

    Hier noch eine Information vom "Better Business Bureau"
    am Beispiel von Colgate.
    Es liegt nichts gegen CL vor und ich finde das durchaus wissenswert. Allein schon die Tatsache der Mitgliedschaft hat schon eine beruhigende Wirkung und zeugt seitens des Management die Transparenzbereitschaft.

    Gruß
    Dieter

    Mit diesem Link sollte man dorthin gelangen.

    http://www.newyork.bbb.org/nis....0000558


    Original Business
    Start Date: 1/1/1806
    Local Phone Number: (212)310-2000
    Fax Number: (212)310-2873
    Membership Status: YES
    TOB Classification: CONSUMER HOUSEHOLD PRODUCT
    Web Site URL(s): http://www.colgate.com


    The information in this report has either been provided by the company, or has been compiled by the Bureau from other sources.

    BBB Membership

    This company is a member of the Better Business Bureau. This means it supports the Bureau's services to the public and meets our membership standards.

    Nature Of Business

    This firm offers household products.

    Customer Experience

    The Better Business Bureau generally rates a firm as either having a satisfactory or unsatisfactory record. This firm has a satisfactory record. To have a satisfactory record with the Bureau, a company must be in business for at least 12 months, properly and promptly address matters refered to it by the Bureau, and be free from an unusual volume or pattern of complaints and law enforcement action involving its marketplace conduct. In addition, the Bureau must have a clear understanding of the company's business and no concerns about its industry.

    Colgate-Palmolive Co. manufactures and sells a variety of toothpastes, laundry detergents, soaps, shampoos, dishwashing liquids, cleaners and other household personal and health care products.

    The company's size, volume of business, and number of transactions may have a bearing on the number complaints received by the BBB. The number of complaints filed against a company may not be as important as the type of complaints, and how the company handled them. The BBB generally does not pass judgement on the validity of complaints filed.

    Closed Complaints
    Total number of complaints processed by the BBB in last 36 months: 1
    Total number of complaints processed by the BBB in last 12 months: 0

    Complaints Concerned (Please understand that complaints may concern more than one issue)
    Delivery Issues: 1

    Outcome of all complaints
    Full Adjustment: 1

    Additional Phone Numbers

    (800)338-8388



    Report as of: 9/2/2002

  8. #8
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    25.05.2001
    Ort
    Pfaffenhofen a.d. Ilm
    Beiträge
    1.116

    Standard

    Nützliche Informationen zum Gehalt findet man im "Proxy Statement", das vor der HV bei der SEC eingereicht werden muß. Eine kurze Biografie ist auch enthalten.

    Aber schaut mal selber:

    http://www.sec.gov/Archive....dex.htm

    Gruß
    Dieter

  9. #9
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    01.06.2001
    Ort
    Scherzingen/Schweiz
    Beiträge
    1.029

    Standard

    Hallo Arman,

    die Beurteilung der Gehälter des Managements ist, meiner Meinung nach, sehr komplex und lässt sich nicht einfach mit einer einzigen Aussage erklären.

    Die Gehälter sind abhängig von der Branche, von der wirtschaftlichen Lage, von Bedarf und Nachfrage, vom Wettbewerb, vom Namen.

    Ich selbst schaue mal so auf den ersten Blick nach, ob sich der CEO Gehaltserhöhungen genehmigt. Wenn ja, in welcher Höhe und wie steigerte er dazu im Vergleich den Unternehmenswert. Gibt es hier große Unterschiede? Ein CEO, der sein Gehalt steigert, während das Unternehmen stagniert oder gar rückläufig ist, verliert mein Vertrauen. Das Gleiche gilt für das gesamte Management.

    Kommt der umgekehrte Fall vor, dass bspw. das Management sich die Gehälter kürzt, wenn es dem Unternehmen schlecht geht, imponiert mir das.

    Stock Options, da sie ja allgemein üblich sind und waren, akzeptiere ich bis zu einem bestimmten Umfang. Je weniger, desto besser.

    Viele Grüße
    flippi

  10. #10
    Erfahrener Valueist
    Registriert seit
    21.01.2002
    Ort
    Kiel
    Beiträge
    830

    Standard

    Hallo Flippi-Schatzi,

    @Ich selbst schaue mal so auf den ersten Blick nach, ob sich der CEO Gehaltserhöhungen genehmigt.

    Die entscheiden auch selbst, was sie verdienen?? *

    Wie kriegt man das am besten raus?

    @Ein CEO, der sein Gehalt steigert, während das Unternehmen stagniert oder gar rückläufig ist, verliert mein Vertrauen.

    Meins auch!

    @Kommt der umgekehrte Fall vor, dass bspw. das Management sich die Gehälter kürzt, wenn es dem Unternehmen schlecht geht, imponiert mir das.

    Mir auch!

    @Stock Options, da sie ja allgemein üblich sind und waren, akzeptiere ich bis zu einem bestimmten Umfang.

    Bis zu welchem Umfang?

    Viele Grüße
    \"Price is what you pay, Value is what you get\"

    (Warren Buffett)

Lesezeichen

Berechtigungen

  • Neue Themen erstellen: Nein
  • Themen beantworten: Nein
  • Anhänge hochladen: Nein
  • Beiträge bearbeiten: Nein
  •